Biological Pollutants In Your Home

Prepared by: The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), and
The American Lung Association, The Christmas Seal People

This guidance will help you understand:

  1. what indoor biological pollution is;
  2. whether your home or lifestyle promotes its development; and,
  3. how to control its growth and buildup.

Outdoor air pollution in cities is a major health problem. Much effort and money continues to be spent cleaning up pollution in the outdoor air. But air pollution can be a problem where you least expect it, in the place you may have thought was safest–your home. Many ordinary activities such as cooking, heating, cooling, cleaning, and redecorating can cause the release and spread of indoor pollutants at home. Studies have shown that the air in our homes can be even more polluted than outdoor air.

Many Americans spend up to 90 percent of their time indoors, often at home. Therefore, breathing clean indoor air can have an important impact on health. People who are inside a great deal may be at greater risk of developing health problems, or having problems made worse by indoor air pollutants. These people include infants, young children, the elderly, and those with chronic illnesses.